APR

IT & Education: Language Differences

I once served on a committee hiring a professional who was primarily going to serve as network administrator. We were in the second interview, so there were fewer questions and more discussions. The candidate asked, “What can you tell me about the environment?” The superintendent who admitted little knowledge of technology began describing efforts they Read More

APR

Elevator Pitch on IT Mission Creep

“Mission creep” is a familiar concept. An organization undertakes a project with an intended outcome defined–it is the value that will accrue as the project becomes complete. Over time, the project expands to include more and more outcomes. Before leaders stop to realize it, the original mission has become something far different. In schools, computers Read More

APR

Why is Education Always Reforming?

Although the constant cycles of reforms can be tiresome for many educators, the cycle can be explained by and even predicted by aspects of education that are well-known. First, education is a field that requires continuous improvement. One never “achieves being a good educator,” we adopt new practices, adapt existing practice to unfamiliar students, and Read More

APR

On Social Cognition

Humans are social creatures. Our brains function differently when we are engaged with others compared to when we are engages alone. We have capacity to solve much more complex problems when working together compared to when we work alone, but we also have greater capacity to deceive ourselves.  This summer, I finally read Edwin Hutchin’s Cognition Read More

APR

On Collapse

Rereading Jared Diamond’s Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed has been on my “to do” list for some time. I first read it about when the second edition was published. I’m a fan of Diamond’s work. I especially appreciate the detailed evidence and analysis he adds to popular writing. While I am not Read More

APR

On Change

In their 2010 book Change, Chip Heath and Dan Heath, scholars and business leader who study change, attributed resistance to change to three factors. These are observed regardless of the type of change. First, until new practices become habit, people must exert self-control to adopt them; this self-control is necessary to continue using the new Read More