How-Networks-Arrived-in-Schools

edtech for IT: On Collaboration

Humans have a long history with technology. It is reasonable to conclude that humans and their technologies cannot be separated. Without our tools, our species would not have become the Earth-altering species we have become.  When reviewing the history of our technology, we see that information technologies are a relatively recent invention, but for several Read More

How-Networks-Arrived-in-Schools

edtech for IT: Appropriate, Proper, Reasonable

No IT professional wants users of their systems to be ineffective and complaining. This poses a difficulty for IT professionals who move from business in to education. IT professionals will notice differences (some nuanced and some significant) between the needs and expectations of IT users in business and IT in school. With the more complete Read More

How-Networks-Arrived-in-Schools

edtech for IT: Acceptable Use Policies

All organizations have acceptable use policies which that define what users are allowed to do with devices and systems owned by the organization. These policies are approved by organization’s governing bodies (school board are generally responsible for adopting policy) and are intended to protect the organization and the systems they support.  In general, the role Read More

How-Networks-Arrived-in-Schools

edtech for IT: Assistive Technologies & Accessibility

School IT professionals often collaborate with special education teachers, leaders, and consultants to select, install, configure, maintain, and manage assistive technologies necessary for students who need them. These devices include items such as Braille printers, keyboards for specialized input, specialized displays, assistive listening systems (for individual students and for groups in presentation spaces), and other Read More

How-Networks-Arrived-in-Schools

#edtech for #IT: Copyright

One of the most challenging issues related to digital information in schools is copyright. This is especially true in the time since one-to-one initiatives became common. One rationale for adding computing devices for each student to the budget was that textbooks (traditionally a very expensive resource) would no longer be necessary. While textbooks that are Read More